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Quality Water from the Ground Up

We are always happy to answer your questions when you call our office or when we are on a service call for you. But in the event that you have questions when we are unavailable we offer this list of frequently asked questions.

Frequently Asked Questions

What does a water-well system include?

  • Although most residential water-well systems consist of the same basic equipment, there can be variations based on previous installers and their solution to specific needs of the home owner and the amount of water produced. The most basic system in our area usually consists of:
    • Drilled well
    • Submersible pump and motor installed in the well
    • String of pipe to bring the water to the surface
    • Wire to carry the electricity down to the pump
    • Pressure tank and controls at the surface or in the basement

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I don't have any water!

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I don't have any or enough pressure!

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My pump keeps cycling do I need service?

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Why does my water smell?

How deep do I have to go to get "good" water?

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  • Good water is directly related to the geological formations where the well is located rather than any specific foot depth. It is not possible to make a rule for the specific depth needed to have good water. As mentioned before, mineral formations vary from site to site but the general rule is that the deeper you go there is more chance for increased minerals. The primary test of a good well is that it provides enough water to meet the homeowner’s needs. Measuring how good the water is depends on the homeowner’s preference and needs. A water softner may be the only treatment some well owners need to meet their preferences, while others may require additional treatment methods to achieve their perception of good water. Our staff can provide testing and suggestions for a complete water system to meet your specific needs. We also suggest that you take a drink... Do you like it??? We strongly suggest that you are the best judge of what is good water.

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Will I need a water softener with my existing or new well?

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Does it matter what brand of softener I choose?

  • There are many popular brands of water softener’s on the market, and for every brand in existence there is a story to tell about what it does and how it does it better than others. The truth is that every water softener performs the same basic process. It filters the water though softener media that removes the hardness from the water. The minerals removed are periodically flushed out of this filter media and uses salt or other minerals to cleanse the filter media. Beyond that, the softeners have many unique ways to accomplish these simple steps. We believe that softeners, just like other water treatments, must be matched to the well they are attached to. As water professionals we believe in a total water treatment system, the softener is just one part of that entire system. Our staff is trained to evaluate the entire water system to provide you with the safest and most economical solution for your water needs.

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Do I need to chlorinate my well and is that something I can do?

  • Many water well systems benefit from chlorination, also known as "shocking the well" on a regular basis. Generally if your well is known to have bacterial iron (harmless but unsightly) a regular chlorination procedure is recommended. Other water conditions may also indicate this treatment to maintain a fresh water supply. Our staff can provide this service but for most homeowner’s that are a bit “handy” we have provided a printable document to guide you through this process.
  • Well Chlorination Instructions

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What about Arsenic?

  • Arsenic is a naturally occurring element that sometimes is found in water supply wells. The EPA recommended limit is 10 parts per billion. Water that exceeds 10 ppb can be treated to reduce the arsenic level. Treatment depends on the level and the type of arsenic found. We offer more information on our Arsenic Page

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